How Can We Change The World (Sustainably)?

I tried to change the world back in the ’70s.
With reverence for Nature.
Sustainably.
It was called Permaculture.
It was a brilliant concept.
To create a permanent, self-sustaining, life-affirming culture.
A culture that respected the land beneath us.
I’ve written a book about this and other sustainable concepts to change the world.
Ideas we can all, individually as well as collectively, use right now.
Get it here.

Permaculture is about working with
rather than against Nature.

Created over 40 years ago by two
academics from the University of Tasmania,
Prof. Bill Mollison and David Holmgren,
today it’s a successful worldwide
phenomenon that’s changing communities
and transforming lives.
Small communities are thriving where
before they were poverty stricken and failing.

Permaculture is greening the planet, a
little at a time, and I hope this social saviour
continues to change the world.

From whole communities to suburban
backyards it’s use of plants and clever design
principles is creating an intelligent solution to
the realistic use of Nature to enhance lives.
For years I’d been reading copies of the
‘Organic Gardening’ Magazine and studying
the principles of organic gardening, no-dig
gardening, chemical-free gardening and other
sustainable self-sufficient ways of living.
Then along came the new Permaculture
and I threw myself into learning about it.
I bought a copy of their new book
‘Permaculture One’.
I was there at their weekend workshop
in the Dandenong Ranges in Victoria where I
sat with other enthusiasts including Professor
Bill Mollison, one of the founders, and the
Deputy Prime Minister, Dr Jim Cairns, who at
that time was leader of the new Down-to Earth
movement and was leading the record anti-Vietnam War protests in Melbourne.
We bought a cottage on an acre of land
near the town of Daylesford fully planning to
create my own Permaculture acre and move
in to live my own self-sustainable life off the grid.

My dream never happened. Then.
For a few years my peaceful cottage in
Victoria’s Central Highlands was my sanity
retreat from the stressful world of advertising
in Melbourne which was heading downhill to
eventual land me bankrupt.
I had to sell my Permaculture dream to
help finance my fast disappearing business.
I never recovered.
Fifty years later I feel the time has arrived to look again.
β€œThe only ethical decision,” said Bill
Mollison,β€œ is to take responsibility for our own
existence and that of our children.”

Buy my new world-changing book here.

Love and Peace.

Neil.