What Happens When You Die?

A long time ago, far far away, I had a chance meeting with a Wise Woman.

She became a good friend.

Until she died of cancer a few years later.

She was the Librarian at the Melbourne Theosophical Society.

Their Headquarters is in Adyar, India.

With a motto of ‘There is no religion higher than truth’ they encourage the study of all religions.

I was in.

I threw myself into my own study of all spiritual philosophies.

Including what happens when we die.

Today I feel that our soul survives this lifetime.

And is reborn.

Lately I’ve been thinking:

Do I really want to leave this beautiful world?

With all its problems?

What if my next life is on an alien planet with no trees or birds or the smell of cut grass?

What if it’s all black-and-white without colour?

Or what if it’s a world of thought without physical form?

This is not such a bad place to live if only we could clean up the mess.

The poverty.

The destruction.

So let’s do it.

All of us who care.

You and me.

We already live in a world of thought.

Our thoughts need physical bodies to work though.

How can we clean up our beautiful planet alone?

Others are trying.

But how can we do it alone.

I know the answer:

With our thoughts.

Trouble is, isn’t it our thoughts that have created and maintained today’s messed up world.

From the pollution to the violence.

Physically others are doing all they can.

Then there’s our thoughts.

It’s your thoughts, together with mine and others, that could do the trick.

With our thought we can be there, everywhere, in a thought.

We can avoid the cruel television dramas.

The violent movies.

The computer war games.

The selective brain washing evening news.

We can replace that with our thoughts of the world we want, not the world that amuses us.

“With our thoughts we make the world,” the Buddha said.

Is it our only hope to create the world we want.

Think big but let’s think change.

Think about it.

Love and peace.

Neil.

PS. Recommended – ‘Our Thoughts Can Change The World’ (104 pages) and The Great Regency Cover-Up’ (236 pages).