I Went to Yoga Classes at a Hindu Yoga Ashram in Australia.

I was living alone in a caravan in Central Victoria, Australia.

A group of us went off once a week to a Hindu Ashram in the middle of nowhere for yoga nidra lessons.

And a very memorable time.

I was living in a caravan in Central Victoria.

A friend was a member of the nearby Rocklyn Yoga Ashram.

The ashram was located in a peaceful retreat centre in the heart of the Wombat Forest.

I’d already learned chakra yoga with Australia’s first full time yoga teacher.

Margrit Segesman taught me a form of yoga that I practiced daily for over 50 years.

There were 10 asanas or positions based on balancing the 7 major chakras.

I believe they kept me healthy and physically and mentally well for most of my life.

You should think about learning chakra yoga too.

No matter what your age.

I was 24.

Both yoga and chakra balancing are beneficial in so many ways.

And yoga is relaxing for starters.

Margrit Segesman’s interest in breathing and relaxation techniques branched into an interest in the expansion of consciousness, a subject she had discussed with Carl Jung when they met in the 1920s.

He suggested the study of yoga and yogic philosophy and reading The Science of Breath by Yogi Ramacharaka.

As well as studying philosophy, she developed her own progressive yoga relaxation technique that she later incorporated into her classes.

After spending time in Indian ashrams, she found her guru at Rishikesh on the Tibetan border and spent about five years living in a cave as an ascetic:

“For years I knew nothing else but meditation, raja yoga, hatha yoga, the intense practices of kriya and tantra, [and the] study of cosmology and evolution,” she later wrote.”

When she set up her school, she found Melbournians were keen to embrace yoga which was still considered to be very ‘new and exotic’ for Australia.

However, following a radio interview about her relaxation technique, Margrit was inundated with students and so took the step to full-time teaching.

When she embarked on her voyage from Switzerland in 1954, Margrit planned to travel to Sydney, but mistakenly stepped off the boat in Melbourne instead.

The Gita School of Yoga was Australia’s first full-time yoga school with its own permanent premises, offering classes each week day and night.

I remember having to step carefully along a narrow pebbled path to arrive at the front door – beginning class with a walking meditation.

A class then consisted of limbering, ten basic yoga asanas with many variations, breathing practices and relaxation.

On 22 September 1960 the Gita School of Yoga opened at 21 Alfred Place, Melbourne, which ran alongside St Paul’s Cathedral.

Soon after I was there as one of her early students.

Be well and healthy.

Neil

PS. Click here for the Rocklyn Yoga Ashram’s website.

Discover my new book of my real recent New Age adventures here in ‘Man Steps Off Planet’.